Adele Gallogly

REFLECTIONS & REVIEWS

Ecclesiastes and the women of Mad Men

5 Comments

*Dorky confession: once upon a Christmastime my photographer sister persuaded me and my friends to dress up in 60’s fashion ala “Mad Men”. #dressupforgrownps

I share some thoughts on Ecclesiastes and the women of MadMen* over at ThinkChristian today. A snippet:

I wish I could call upon [Eugene] Peterson to pitch his contemporary paraphrase of Ecclesiastes to the denizens in the disturbingly materialistic and misogynistic world of “Mad Men,”which has its season finale Sunday.  It seems especially fitting to a 1960s advertising agency, with its ad-friendly colloquial phrases and repeated imagery of smoke. (Lucky Strike, anyone?)

Vanity of vanities, all is vanity … Everything is meaningless chasing after wind. These are anti-taglines that protagonist Don Draper (Jon Hamm) could use. He’s had a few decent – even tender – moral turns this season, but he is still very much vainly chasing the altars of power and wealth.

But enough about Don for the moment. I’d like to hold Ecclesiastes’ warnings up to two female characters: Peggy (Elisabeth Moss), the lead copywriter, and the office manager, Joan (Christina Hendricks). They’ve both made daring changes and hard choices this season. Will they be in vain?

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Author: Adele Gallogly

I'm a writer and editor living in the lovely city of Hamilton, Ontario. By day, I write for World Renew, a relief and development agency; during evenings and weekends, I let short stories, essays, and other pieces out to play. I like to write about the intersection of faith, art, culture, and justice.

5 thoughts on “Ecclesiastes and the women of Mad Men

  1. Love how much Mad Men has to say to us; I just wrote about it the other day!

  2. i can’t watch that show for the same reason i can’t watch “house.” the main character(s) are just not likable. they’re all rude, selfish, boorish, sexist, and all you said. the women are very pretty, that’s for sure, but it’s not enough of a reason to spend an hour in front of the tv.

  3. Never has a television program made me so happy to have been raised in modest, unassuming circumstances.

  4. Adele, have you watched any of the back season episodes with the director’s commentary on? I find it fascinating to listen to all the thought that goes into the writing of this show.

    • I haven’t, Nancy–but I would love to get that behind-the-scenes look at this intriguing show. I’ll have to see if I can get the DVDs! And thanks for letting me know.

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